Eyelid surgery - Blepharoplasty

Upper and lower eyelid surgery

The most common cosmetic/aesthetic face surgery procedures include modification of the eyelids (called blepharoplasty). The skin of the upper and lower eyelid is the thinnest on the body. This area, which is exposed to extreme strain due to facial expressions, therefore shows visible signs of ageing rather early compared to other parts of the face.

Drooping upper eyelids are due to many external and internal factors including bad lifestyle, smoking or large weight loss; inner factors include genetic predispositions, hormonal disorders and, last but not least, age. Swollen eyelids and lower eyelid “bags”, so called “fat prolapse”, are fat pads pushed out of the orbit through the thin membrane right into the area of eyelids.

How is eyelid surgery performed?

The upper eyelid surgery consists in removing excess skin (sometimes including the muscle) and fat pads, if they are prominent. The procedure is usually performed only under local anaesthesia.

Lower eyelid surgery consists mainly in removing fat pads and strengthening of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Only small strip of the skin is removed due to possible postoperative complications associated with more radical approaches. Lower eyelid surgery can be performed with conventional method or with CO2 laser beam in transconjunctival blepharoplasty.

Skin incisions are made so as to be as little noticeable as possible – ie., in the inward bend of the upper eyelid in upper blepharoplasty or just below the lashes in case of lower eyelid surgeries. They are usually directed laterally to merge with mimic wrinkles. Stitches are usually removed 5-7 days after the surgery according to the surgeon's practice.

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