Dentoalveolar surgery

In this department we perform complex extractions (pulling out teeth), resections, cyst surgeries, plastic surgeries on the soft tissues of the oral cavity, modifications of the prosthetic bed before removable dentures are made, and other procedures requiring specialized care of a dental surgeon, which may be performed on an outpatient basis. For customers of the surgical department, a high-standard separate lounge with beds is ready; customers use it especially after procedures performed under general conscious sedation.

Dental surgery, or stomatologic surgery, represents a more specialized field of maxillofacial or oral and facial surgery. As the name suggests, dental surgery deals with all problems closely related to the oral cavity, i.e. those having their origin in the tooth or teeth. From the perspective of a physician - surgeon, it is a science, craft, and art – all in one. From the perspective of the patient it may often be an unpleasant memory of a sleepless night, a physician tired of his night duty, fear of pain. Many people (including fellow physicians) feel their blood freeze in their veins and all their neglected all start bothering them when they merely hear the root of the word, “stoma”. But there is also the other part of the word - “surgery”, so it will probably get bloody! And thus one’s mind images other scarlet terms, such as “wisdom tooth”, “last molars”, “root abscess”, “periostitis”, “abscess”, “cyst”, “excision”, “resection”, “extraction”, “excochleation”, etc. .....

Surgery is an invasive field, so when it comes to that, other conservative approaches were most probably already used or rejected. In order to help, the surgeon often needs to remove, together with the “pain” (e.g. focus of inflammation), also a part of the affected tissue (excision), organ (resection, amputation), or the entire organ (-ectomy, extraction, enucleation). From this point of view, every dentist is a surgeon, as drilling teeth means preparation of living tissue.

 

The vast majority of dental surgery interventions are performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia, which essentially means chemical and temporary “unplugging” of nerve fibers transmitting pain impulses. The numb area is perceived as frozen. The pain is eliminated and the whole treatment is very well tolerated. Whereas under conscious sedation the patient enters a kind of controlled sleep, he/she is relaxed and almost does not perceive his/her environment, during the procedure performed under local anesthesia he/she is completely conscious and, if needed, able to cooperate with the surgeon, which implies also certain advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. The state-of-the-art technology, medicine and pharmacy offer enormous possibilities facilitating the surgery to both the surgeon and the patient. Ultimately, however, it will always be up to the man to use a humane attitude.

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